Where have all the Elders gone?

elders

When you  become Orthodox, or even when you are being attracted to it, you find many things to read. Among those things were stories of wonderful Elders, spirit bearing Fathers, who exhibited incredible humility, delivered people from illness and demonic influence, and who seemed to be able to read the hearts of men and women who came to them for advice.  Sometimes, their counsel was supportive and nurturing. Other times, their words could be challenging and corrective.

So, given my experience of the Faith thus far, I wonder where have all the Elders gone?  I know that events in history have had in impact. I have heard of some who live today though I haven’t met them personally. While these may be true Elders, compared to the past, they seem to be few and far between.  Maybe its just because I am an American convert living in the rural South, but I have another idea.

Maybe there are few Elders because we are no longer worthy of them. What I mean is that it has been my sad experience that no one wants to be corrected.  Years ago, as a young man, I was impressed with these words from Proverbs:
9:8  Reprove not a scorner, lest he hate thee: rebuke a wise man, and he will love thee.

12.1  Whoso loveth instruction loveth knowledge: but he that hateth reproof is brutish.

12.15  The way of a fool is right in his own eyes: but he that hearkeneth unto counsel is wise.

This is just a few verses among many that deal with true wisdom and foolishness. The King James version uses some harsh words: hate, rebuke, scorner, reproof, brutish. No one is mincing words here. But this may lay at the heart of the matter. We think much of those who speak kindly to us,  who mainly encourage us on the path we have chosen, or who simply give “helpful hints for hurtful habits.”  To give advice that comes to the level of reproof or instruction is to cause offense. People then go off in a snit and refuse to communicate because the one giving advice had hurt their feelings.  The voice of the watchman has been lost. We will hear no warning for what we do.

So, again, what would a group of Elders do with people like us? They wouldn’t have much to do. We don’t want correction, we don’t want instruction, and Lord knows we don’t want to be reproved or rebuked.  Its too embarrassing or  it just makes us angry. Our pride will not abide with contradiction.

Where have all the Elders gone? On Mt. Athos everyone? When will we ever learn…when will we learn?

 

2 Responses to “Where have all the Elders gone?”

  1. Anonymous Person, an anonymous Eastern Orthodox Christian Says:

    You are absolutely right. When wil we ever learn. Blessed Hieromonk Seraphim Rose of Platina said the exact same thing.

    The following letter was written by Hieromonk Seraphim in response to a question concerning spiritual guidance.

    Dear brother in Christ:

    Greetings in our Lord Jesus Christ! Thank you for your letter. I appreciate the seriousness of what you have written, and I will reply with the same seriousness.

    I must tell you first of all that, to the best of our knowledge, there are no startsi today—that is, truly God-bearing elders (in the spirit of the Optina elders) who could guide you not by their own wisdom and understanding of the Holy Fathers, but by the enlightenment of the Holy Spirit. This kind of guidance is not given to our times—and frankly, we in our weakness and corruption and sins do not deserve it.

    To our times is given a more humble kind of spiritual life, which Bishop Ignatius Brianchaninov in his excellent book The Arena (do you have it?) calls life by counsel—that is, life according to the commandments of God as learned in the Holy Scriptures and Holy Fathers and helped by those who are elder and more experienced. A starets can give commands; but a counselor gives advice, which you must test in experience.

    We do not know of anyone in particular who would be especially able to counsel you in the English language. If this is really needful for you, God will send it to you in His time, according to your faith and need, and without your making too deliberate a search for it.

    Since you have written me, I will venture to give you a word or two of general advice, based upon what you have said in your letters, as derived from the experience of our small monastic community and our reading of the Holy Fathers.

    1) Learn first of all to be at peace with the spiritual situation which has been given you, and to make the most of it. If your situation is spiritually barren, do not let this discourage you, but work all the harder at what you yourself can do for your spiritual life. It is already something very important to have access to the Sacraments and regular church services. Beyond this you should have regular morning and evening prayers with your family, and spiritual reading—all according to your strength and the possibilities afforded by your circumstances.

    2) Among spiritual writings you should read especially those addressed to people living in the world, or which give the ABCs of spiritual life—such as St. John of Kronstadt’s My Life in Christ, St. Nikodemos Unseen Warfare, the Lives of Saints in general, and Bishop Ignatius Brianchaninov’s The Arena (this book, while addressed to novices, is suitable for laymen insofar as it gives in general the ABCs of spiritual life as applied to modern times).

    3) To help your spiritual growth and remind you of spiritual truths, it would be good to keep a journal (the hardbound record books sold in stationery stores are good), which would include excerpts from the writings of spiritual books which you find especially valuable or applicable to you, and perhaps comments of your own inspired by reading and reflection, including brief comments on your own shortcomings which you need to correct. St. John of Kronstadt found this especially valuable, as can be seen in his My Life in Christ.

    4) Don’t criticize or judge other people—regard everyone else as an angel, justify their mistakes and weaknesses, and condemn only yourself as the worst sinner. This is step one in any kind of spiritual life.

    I offer this for whatever help it may be to you. I would be glad to try to answer any specific questions you might have, especially on the teaching of the Holy Fathers, almost all of which we have access to in Russian-language editions.

    Asking your prayers,

    With love in Christ,
    Seraphim, monk

    From Living Orthodoxy, Jan.-Feb., 1984.

    Taken from: http://www.desertwisdom.org/dttw/truth/fr-seraphim-rose/excerpts.html

  2. Anonymous Person, an anonymous Eastern Orthodox Christian Says:

    You are absolutley right. Blessed Hieromonk (priest-monk) Seraphim Rose of Platina said the exact same thing.

    The following letter was written by Hieromonk Seraphim in response to a question concerning spiritual guidance.

    Dear brother in Christ:

    Greetings in our Lord Jesus Christ! Thank you for your letter. I appreciate the seriousness of what you have written, and I will reply with the same seriousness.

    I must tell you first of all that, to the best of our knowledge, there are no startsi today—that is, truly God-bearing elders (in the spirit of the Optina elders) who could guide you not by their own wisdom and understanding of the Holy Fathers, but by the enlightenment of the Holy Spirit. This kind of guidance is not given to our times—and frankly, we in our weakness and corruption and sins do not deserve it.

    To our times is given a more humble kind of spiritual life, which Bishop Ignatius Brianchaninov in his excellent book The Arena (do you have it?) calls life by counsel—that is, life according to the commandments of God as learned in the Holy Scriptures and Holy Fathers and helped by those who are elder and more experienced. A starets can give commands; but a counselor gives advice, which you must test in experience.

    We do not know of anyone in particular who would be especially able to counsel you in the English language. If this is really needful for you, God will send it to you in His time, according to your faith and need, and without your making too deliberate a search for it.

    Since you have written me, I will venture to give you a word or two of general advice, based upon what you have said in your letters, as derived from the experience of our small monastic community and our reading of the Holy Fathers.

    1) Learn first of all to be at peace with the spiritual situation which has been given you, and to make the most of it. If your situation is spiritually barren, do not let this discourage you, but work all the harder at what you yourself can do for your spiritual life. It is already something very important to have access to the Sacraments and regular church services. Beyond this you should have regular morning and evening prayers with your family, and spiritual reading—all according to your strength and the possibilities afforded by your circumstances.

    2) Among spiritual writings you should read especially those addressed to people living in the world, or which give the ABCs of spiritual life—such as St. John of Kronstadt’s My Life in Christ, St. Nikodemos Unseen Warfare, the Lives of Saints in general, and Bishop Ignatius Brianchaninov’s The Arena (this book, while addressed to novices, is suitable for laymen insofar as it gives in general the ABCs of spiritual life as applied to modern times).

    3) To help your spiritual growth and remind you of spiritual truths, it would be good to keep a journal (the hardbound record books sold in stationery stores are good), which would include excerpts from the writings of spiritual books which you find especially valuable or applicable to you, and perhaps comments of your own inspired by reading and reflection, including brief comments on your own shortcomings which you need to correct. St. John of Kronstadt found this especially valuable, as can be seen in his My Life in Christ.

    4) Don’t criticize or judge other people—regard everyone else as an angel, justify their mistakes and weaknesses, and condemn only yourself as the worst sinner. This is step one in any kind of spiritual life.

    I offer this for whatever help it may be to you. I would be glad to try to answer any specific questions you might have, especially on the teaching of the Holy Fathers, almost all of which we have access to in Russian-language editions.

    Asking your prayers,

    With love in Christ,
    Seraphim, monk

    From Living Orthodoxy, Jan.-Feb., 1984.

    Taken from: http://www.desertwisdom.org/dttw/truth/fr-seraphim-rose/excerpts.html

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